164 Higher-Risk Lead Poisoning Zip Codes in Phoenix

Over 160 zip codes in the Phoenix metro have been identified by a state agency as areas of elevated risk to residents for lead poisoning. Each of the zip codes has one or more neighborhoods that have been deemed notable for higher environmental lead levels.

Neighborhoods can have elevated risk for a variety of reasons. Industry, mining, shooting ranges, furniture refinishing, auto repair shops, scrap metal yards and zip codes with an inventory of pre-1978 homes all present factors that can increase the likelihood of exposure.

The Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) publishes the 2018 Arizona High Risk Lead Poisoning Zip Codes for the 15 counties in the state. I recently noticed the list posted on the wall of my son’s pediatrician’s office.

Below is the list of the affected areas in Maricopa and Pinal Counties.

If you live in or are considering moving to one of these zip codes, it doesn’t mean that you should change your plans or your address. Frankly, the list covers almost half of the Phoenix metro. However, be aware of the dangers of lead poisoning, especially if there are children in your home.

For example, remodeling a home built before 1978 where children are living or frequently visiting presents one of the highest risks. Lead-based paints were banned federally for consumer use in the 1970s and were considered to be largely out of circulation by 1978.

That year is recognized as a threshold on and after which lead-based paints were not used in home construction. The pre-1978 residences may have lead-based paint under fresher coats that can fall to the ground as chips or become airborne dust during a remodel.

lead poisoning Phoenix Arizona pediatrician posting wall lead
High-risk lead poisoning zip codes for 15 Arizona counties posted on the wall of a pediatrician’s office in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Exposure in children occurs when they swallow lead dust or breathe fumes. It causes developmental, behavioral and cognitive impairment. Small amounts of the dense metal collect in bones and soft tissue and act as a neurotoxin. Children who have been exposed may have no outward symptoms.

Lead exposure can also affect adults, but children are at the highest risk until they reach the age of 6.

Monitoring possible exposure at an early age is critical. The only way to conduct an accurate assessment for lead exposure is through a blood draw.

The ADHS recommends that children who either live in or frequently visit these high-risk zip codes be tested at least twice for high lead levels at 12 months and again at 24 months of age. Testing is recommended at 36 months and 72 months for children who have never been previously tested. Pregnant women exposed to high lead levels can pass the toxin on to their unborn children.

In 2016, 340 children from across Arizona were found to have elevated lead levels in their blood according to the ADHS pamphlet.

Lead can be found in dust and soil around the outside of the home. Additionally, if your home in Phoenix was built prior to 1930, it may contain lead drinking water pipes. Notably, it wasn’t until 1986 that lead solder for joints in potable water plumbing was federally banned.

The ADHS high-risk Maricopa County zip codes are:

  • Aguila 85320*
  • Avondale 85323, 85329*, 85392
  • Buckeye 85326, 85396
  • Chandler 85224, 85225, 85226, 85244*, 85246*, 85286
  • Chandler Heights 85127*
  • El Mirage 85335
  • Fort McDowell 85264
  • Fountain Hills 85268, 85269*
  • Gila Bend 85337
  • Gilbert 85236*, 85296, 85299*
  • Glendale 85301, 85302, 85303, 85304, 85306, 85307, 85311*, 85312*, 85318*
  • Goodyear 85338, 85395
  • Laveen 85339
  • Litchfield Park 85340
  • Mesa 85201, 85202, 85203, 85204, 85205, 85206, 85207, 85208, 85209, 85210, 85211*, 85212, 85213, 85214*, 85216*, 85274*, 85275*
  • Peoria 85345, 85380*, 85385*
  • Phoenix 85003, 85005*, 85006, 85007, 85008, 85009, 85010*, 85011*, 85012, 85013, 85014, 85015, 85016, 85017, 85018, 85019, 85020, 85021, 85022, 85023, 85024, 85027, 85028, 85029, 85030*, 85031, 85032, 85033, 85034, 85035, 85036*, 85037, 85038*, 85040, 85041, 85042, 85043, 85046*, 85050, 85051, 85053, 85060*, 85061*, 85062*, 85063*, 85064*, 85066*, 85067*, 85068*, 85069*, 85070*, 85071*, 85072*, 85074*, 85075*, 85078*, 85079*, 85080*, 85082*, 85086
  • Queen Creek 85142
  • Scottsdale 85250, 85251, 85252*, 85256, 85257, 85260, 85261*, 85267*, 85271*
  • Sun City 85351, 85372*, 85373
  • Surprise 85378, 85379, 85387
  • Tempe 85280*, 85281, 85282, 85283, 85285*
  • Tolleson 85353
  • Tonopah 85354
  • Tortilla Flat 85190*
  • Wickenburg 85358*, 85390
  • Wittman 85361
  • Youngtown 85363

The ADHS high-risk Pinal County zip codes are:

  • Apache Junction 85117*, 85119, 85120, 85178*
  • Arizona City 85123
  • Casa Grande 85122, 85130*, 85194
  • Coolidge 85128
  • Eloy 85131
  • Florence 85132
  • Gold Canyon 85118
  • Hayden 85135*
  • Maricopa (Town of) 85138, 85139
  • Oracle 85623
  • Picacho 85141*
  • San Manuel 85631
  • San Tan Valley 85140, 85143
  • Superior 85173
  • Valley Farms 85191*

*Zip codes with an asterisk are “P.O. Box Only” zip codes where there are no physical residences, only post office box mail delivery to a local USPS branch

If your metro Phoenix home zip code doesn’t appear on the list, the ADHS still recommends that you complete this lead exposure questionnaire as a risk assessment to discuss with your child’s physician. Lead can still be found around the household in pottery, spices, toys, fishing lures, ammunition and stained glass.

Use this map to see a visual representation of the high-risk zip codes.


I have bitten down or swallowed a few pellets through the years. My uncle had his appendix removed and there were over 100 lead pellets in it. He might have died of lead poisoning. Now that is eating a lot of game! – Phil Robertson, American hunter, sportsman, and star of reality TV show Duck Dynasty on the A&E Network